Having learned from his past, Nick Foles ready to lead Bears forward

Foles has been named the Bears' starting quarterback moving forward.
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(670 The Score) At the height of his career, quarterback Nick Foles led Philadelphia to an improbable Super Bowl championship.

To commemorate Foles' remarkable achievement of being named the MVP of Super Bowl LII in February 2018, the Eagles organization later put up a statue of Foles outside of Lincoln Financial Stadium. But Foles doesn't look at that as what defines him.

"I don't hold tight to the Lombardi Trophy," Foles said. "I want the success to be a byproduct of the little things each and every day."

That's the mindset Foles is taking into his newest opportunity, which is leading the Bears as their starting quarterback.

For the triumphs that the 31-year-old Foles has experienced, he has also endured many more trials. He was traded by the Eagles in 2015 to end his first stint with the team, nearly retired prior to the 2016 season with the Chiefs and was benched with the Jaguars last season. Foles has mostly been a career backup and has never started more than 11 games in a single season.

Foles was again a backup with the Bears entering this season, but then he came off the bench to help Chicago erase a 16-points deficit in a 30-26 win at Atlanta last Sunday. After replacing Mitchell Trubisky -- the No. 2 overall pick in 2017 whose future with the Bears is in doubt -- Foles has now been thrust into the full-time starting role.

Foles takes over the position boasting comfort in coach Matt Nagy's offense while carrying the kind of leadership that can help the Bears' offense take strides forward.

"He brings a lot of experience," receiver Allen Robinson told reporters Tuesday. "He’s been in this league now nine years. He’s been to a Super Bowl, he’s won a Super Bowl, he’s played in some big games. He's played some big-time football."

Bears quarterbacks coach John DeFilippo has worked with Foles during stops in Philadelphia, Jacksonville and now Chicago, and he has come to appreciate Foles' football intelligence.

"He does a great job of learning from his past experiences," DeFilippo said. "Nick has been on a bunch of different teams and been coached by a bunch of different guys and gone through a bunch of different plays. So, I think he does a really nice job of taking those experiences that he’s had in his past, putting it in the back of his memory bank and being able to use that information to help him execute the plays.

"That’s a rare quality to me. There’s not a lot of guys out there that think that way, and I think that really helps Nick.”

In directing the Bears' offense, Foles will be tasked with bringing it more consistency. That's something Trubisky struggled to create, with Bears drives too often stalling because of uneven play at quarterback.

The Bears are averaging 24.7 points and an efficient 5.3 yards per play through three weeks. They're turning to a quarterback in Foles who has been to the pinnacle and back down during his career.

Foles feels that has made him stronger.

"I’ve said it over and over again that the tough times, they’re not fun, but they equip you for what’s ahead," he said. "As long as you approach it with the right heart."

Injury report: Receiver Ted Ginn Jr., tight end Jimmy Graham, defensive lineman Akiem Hicks, offensive lineman Bobby Massie and linebacker Danny Trevathan were each held out for veteran rest Wednesday afternoon. Outside linebacker Khalil Mack (knee) and safety Deon Bush (groin) were limited. Defensive back Sherrick McManis (hamstring) didn't practice.

Chris Emma covers the Bears, Chicago’s sports scene and more for 670TheScore.com. Follow him on Twitter @CEmma670.

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