Uranus and Neptune are raining diamonds: NASA

Diamonds falling through the air.
Photo credit Getty Images
By , KYW Newsradio

For this rain storm, you might want to turn your umbrella upside down.

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During a recent interview with NASA’s Gravity Assist, astrophysicist Naomi Rowe-Gurney explained how gas-heavy planets Uranus and Neptune rain down what we here on Earth consider precious gemstones.

First, both planets are partially made of methane, which gives them a blue hue.

“Well, methane has carbon in it," Rowe-Gurney explained, "and that carbon can occur by itself and also be crushed by the immense pressures that happen, like, deep in the atmosphere, so much deeper than the levels that I look at."

In addition to methane, Uranus and Neptune both have atmospheres made up of molecular hydrogen and atomic helium.

Neptune is the eighth and farthest know planet from the Sun.
Neptune is the eighth and farthest know planet from the Sun. Photo credit Getty Images

At the center of both planets is a small, rocky core.

View of planet Uranus from space. Space, nebula and planet Uranus. This image elements furnished by NASA.
View of planet Uranus from space. Space, nebula and planet Uranus. This image elements furnished by NASA. Photo credit Getty Images

“Inside the planet, when it gets really hot and really dense, these diamonds form and accumulate, and then they become even heavier,” said Rowe-Gurney. “And that means that they kind of rain down in the atmosphere.”

However, she said the phenomenon is not something humans would be able to witness, of course. As for the diamonds, they aren’t something we would be able to start using for jewelry anyway.

“It’s not the rain that we see here because these pressures are extreme, and you’ll never be able to get there as a human,” she explained. “So even if these diamonds do exist, we would never be able to go and grab them.”

Here on Earth, it looks as if we will have to settle for terrestrial diamonds – some of which are going up in price due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, according to Bloomberg.

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Featured Image Photo Credit: Getty Images