Bittersweet: Sugar, Slavery, Empire and Consumerism in the Atlantic World

January 20, 2020 8EE48DA9-968C-4949-BB39-54C13F5E9E68 Created with sketchtool. 42 min Download
Bittersweet: Sugar, Slavery, Empire and Consumerism in the Atlantic World

Bittersweet: Sugar, Slavery, Empire and Consumerism in the Atlantic World

January 20, 2020 8EE48DA9-968C-4949-BB39-54C13F5E9E68 Created with sketchtool. 42 min Download
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CATEGORY: Society & Culture
2020 Series #3 of 4. What happens when you build an empire on sugar? Since the 18th century, sugar has been one of the most demanded commodities in the West. By the 1700s, technological advancements and production made sugar accessible to even some of the poorest Americans and Europeans, and imperial governments poured millions of dollars into the shaping of sugar colonies around the world. From the Caribbean to southeastern Africa to the Indian Ocean, sugar was king. But just as few today think on where their granulated white sugar comes from, those who consumed the White Gold between the 17th and 20th centuries knew little of the back-breaking, harsh, and unfree labor that went into producing that glorious sweetness, or the lengths to which their own governments went to float those potentially profitable sugar colonies. Empires built on sugar rotted away like teeth too long exposed to that sweetness. Find the complete transcript at digpodcast.org Bibliography James Patterson Smith, “Empire and Social Reform: British Liberals and the ‘Civilizing Mission in the Sugar Colonies,’ 1868-1874,” Albion 27.2 (1995) 253-77 Philip D. Rotz, “Sweetness and Fever? Sugar Production, Aeses aegypti, and Dengue Fever in Natal, South Africa, 1926-27,” PSAE Research Series 12 (2014) “Bussa’s Rebellion,” UK National Archives  Carol MacLennan, Sovereign Sugar : Industry and Environment in Hawaiʻi (University of Hawaii, 2014)  Alice G. Walton, “How Much Sugar Are Americans Eating?” Forbes (Aug 2012)  “Britain is built on sugar: our national sweet tooth defines us,” The Guardian (Oct 2007)  Karl Watson, “Slavery and Economy in Barbados,” BBC (2/2011)  Barrie Cook, “Pieces of Eight,” History of the World in 100 Objects (BBC & British Museum)  Emma George Ross, “The Portuguese in Africa, 1415-1600” Met Museum  Matthew Edel, “The Brazilian Sugar Cycle of the Seventeenth Century and the Rise of the West Indian Competition,” Caribbean Studies 9.1 (1969) 24-43. Mark Johnson, “The Sugar Trade in the West Indies and Brazil between 1492 and 1700,” University of Minnesota Expansion of Empire Seminar  Sidney W. Mintz, “The Culture History of a Puerto Rican Sugar Cane Plantation: 1876-1949,” The Hispanic American Historical Review 33.2 (1953) 224-251. Heather Pringle, “Sugar Masters in a New World,” Smithsonian.com (January 2010)   Pictures & Graphs from C.J. Robertson, “Cane-Sugar Production in the British Empire,” Economic Geography 6.2 (1930) 131-151 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices