Brooklyn Nets and new assistant coach Kyle Korver have a hilarious past

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By , Audacy Sports

Consider the fact that the Nets have had the league leader in three-point percentage in two of the past three seasons in Joe Harris. Consider the fact that they finished second in the league last year in three-point percentage as a team (.392) and were in the top ten in threes made. Consider the fact that James Harden, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant could all very well be playing at full health next season and can all realistically be high-volume 40 percent three-point threats.

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You know who a team like that could really use on the sidelines, just to pile it on the rest of the league? How about the tenth most accurate three-point shooter of all time, a guy who just a handful of years ago led the NBA with a scorching 49.2 percent clip from deep, a guy regarded for over a decade as the epitome of long-range sniping? That's who the Nets went out and got, with NBA insider Shams Charania reporting that Kyle Korver is now one of the team's player development assistant coaches.

Though Korver was never able to produce on the court for the Nets throughout his playing career, it's technically not his first stint with the team. After all, it was none other than the then-New Jersey Nets that selected Korver with the No. 51 overall pick of the 2003 NBA Draft before subsequently shipping him off the Philadelphia. As Yahoo! Sports writer Jack Baer notes, the decision to trade him wasn't one that netted the Nets (no pun intended) all that much in return.

As Korver himself told it, he was traded for an "undisclosed amount of money," one that was used for a soon-obsolete office supply.

Considering Korver averaged 10.3 points per game on .437/.423/.900 shooting splits against the Nets throughout his career, it seems as though he may have played with a chip on his shoulder whenever they were the opponent. Now, he'll work with the opposite thinking, looking to benefit the team in as many ways as possible.

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