Heyward: T.J. Watt thinks he can lead a college football team to a title… as their QB

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By , Audacy Sports

There's not much that T.J. Watt can't do on the defensive side of the ball, and the stats show it. He's one of only three players in NFL history — joining Jason Taylor and Tony Brackens — that has ever recorded a season with at least two interceptions, eight forced fumbles and 12.0 sacks. If that's not versatility and dominance packaged into one, I don't know what is.

Apparently, however, Watt is pretty confident about his abilities on the other side of the ball as well. A former tight end from his high school days, Watt thinks he could contribute so much offensively to a college team that they'd be able to win a national championship on his shoulders... but he wouldn't be playing tight end. He'd be playing quarterback.

Fellow Steelers defensive star Cameron Heyward joined The Rich Eisen Show and shared an example of his teammate's (somewhat irrational) confidence in his quarterback skill set.

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"T.J. is competitive as hell in everything that we do, and he always gives himself a chance," Heyward explained. "Whether it's in a card game where he shouldn't be playing at all, to — this is how demented his mind is. He played quarterback in high school and he swears, to this day, that he could go back in college and lead some team to a national championship.

"And I'm like, 'T.J., you got two bum knees in college to begin with, and now you tell me you can play quarterback?'"

Apparently, this confident outlook on his signal-calling abilities began back in his high school days, says Heyward.

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"First of all, it started off in high school. He could go to any Texas program and take the worst team and take them to their high school championship," Heyward said. "And then he went to college, and we're like, 'T.J., now you're just gassing it up.' So it's pretty wild."

Watt hasn't played an offensive snap in the NFL, much less attempted a pass, so perhaps this is false confidence. But it's this confidence that you need to become a star in football, which is likely true for several other sports — just ask Gabe Kapler — and that sense of trust in his own abilities has allowed for a lot of production in the young career of Watt.

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