What is next for President Trump?

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Ten House Republicans out of 212 voted with Democrats for impeachment.

SMU political scientist Matthew Wilson says it will much harder to convict the president in the senate. That trial would start after the new administration is sworn in.

"There will be a trial, there will be more evidence presented. There will be more time for deliberation and argument, but I would still be surprised if 17 Republicans came onboard for a conviction on impeachment charges after the president has already left office because there would be procedural concerns about that as well" says Wilson.

There would have to a two thirds vote in the senate, to allow for a simple majority vote to ban Mr. Trump from ever seeking federal office again.

But Rice University political scientist Mark Jones says a conviction is possible. He says there's a reasonable possibility that Trump would want to run again.

"The signals that Mitch McConnell is sending is that support for president Trump may be wavering and it could be that McConnell as well as other Republicans decide that what is best for the Republican party is to get Trump as much out of the picture as possible. And one way to do that is to have at least 17 Republicans vote to impeach" says Jones.

He says that scenario is becoming "increasingly likely."

He says its is not a sure thing. "When push comes to shove, there may be enough Republicans who believe that on January 6th, Donald Trump cross the line and the best thing and only hope for the Republican party is that he's out of the picture as much as possible. The best way to get him out of the picture is to prevent a 2024 presidential bid, because in spite of everything that's happened Donald Trump remains quite popular."

Wilson says if the senate does not convict, the 14th amendment could come in to play.  It states a person cannot hold high office if they have participated in rebellion or insurrection against the United States.  "It would be a stretch to prove that in a court of law, but it's something Democrats invoked in spirit to provide motivation for their impeachment."

Mr. Trump will finish out his term next week as the only president to have ever been impeached twice.