Day 5 of Trump impeachment trial: How to watch and listen

By , RADIO.COM

The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump kicked off Tuesday after weeks of uncertainty surrounding the specifics of the trial.

During the trial, Democrats will make an attempt to convince their Republican counterparts in the Senate that Trump incited the Capitol riots on Jan. 6, even as the likelihood of conviction seems highly unlikely.

Read more about the trial and how to tune in below.

How to watch and listen

Watch the fifth day of the Trump impeachment trial in the video above, on Saturday, Feb. 13. Listen live on RADIO.COM.

Why is Trump being put on trial?

The former president is being put on trial for the charge of incitement, which was the basis for his impeachment article. During the trial, impeachment managers will mount an argument for why the president’s actions led to the Capitol siege last month.

What format will the trial take?

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Ver., will preside over the trial, rather than Chief Justice John Roberts. While the chief justice normally presides over impeachment trials, Roberts declined to do so in this case because Trump is not the sitting president.

On Tuesday, four hours were split between House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team to debate whether the trial is constitutional. The Senate voted 56-44 at the end of the day, affirming that the trial is in fact constitutional and thus that it would continued.

The first day was followed by 16 hours over two days for the House to make its argument that started at noon on Wednesday. After this stretch, Trump’s legal team also had 16 hours over two days to make their defense of the former president.

While the Senate will be permitted to depose Trump’s defense team, no witnesses are expected to be called upon. This means that the trial is likely to come to its final vote some time next week.

Will Trump be convicted?

This outcome is considered highly unlikely by lawmakers on both sides in Congress. Democrats in the Senate need 17 Republican votes to successfully convict Trump. In last month’s forced vote on the trial’s constitutionality, 45 Republicans held that the trial is unconstitutional, and 5 voted that it is constitutional. While one more Republican voted on Tuesday that the trial is in fact constitutional, Democrats would need to change the minds of 11 Republican senators, an unlikely outcome, especially as many Republican lawmakers have publicly argued that the trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer sitting president, even as they have been critical of his remarks and actions leading up to the Capitol siege.

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