Behold! James Webb Space Telescope's stunning first full-color images

NASA
Photo credit NASA
By , 1080 KRLD

In the increasingly divided society we currently live in, you might wonder, what does anyone truly have in common? Though we all have differences, there’s one commonality that has prevailed for all of humanity: we are all floating on a rock, flying through outer space at over a million miles an hour.

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Up until 100 years ago, the universe was thought to be a relatively small place. Humans weren’t even aware that other galaxies existed. Today, scientists estimate there are over 100 billion galaxies in our universe, with some studies suggesting there could even be up to 2 trillion.

Thanks to the rapid advancement of technology in the past century, we can observe much more of the universe than we ever thought possible.

At last, here are the first full-color, science-quality images from the James Webb space telescope.

SMACS 0723 or "Webb's Deep Field"

NASA
Photo credit NASA

During a White House event, NASA gave the world a sneak peek at the first full-color images and released 'Webb's First Deep Field,' a photo of galaxy cluster SMAC0723.

Exoplanet WASP-96b Atmosphere Composition

NASA
Photo credit NASA

"Webb spotted the unambiguous signature of water, indications of haze & evidence for clouds (once thought not to exist there)! This is the most detailed exoplanet spectrum to date." - @NASAWEBB on Twitter

Southern Ring nebula

NASA
Photo credit NASA

This photo of NGC 3132, informally known as the Southern ring nebula, reveals a dimmer star at the center of the nebula cloaked in dust.

For comparison, the photo below is the same nebula as captured by NASA's Hubble space telescope in 1998.

Hubble/NASA
Photo credit Hubble/NASA

Stephan's Quintet

NASA
Photo credit NASA

Stephan's Quintet is a visual grouping of five massive galaxies. This enormous mosaic is Webb's largest image to date, according to NASA, and covers about one-fifth of the Moon's diameter in the sky. The photo boasts over 150 million pixels and is made up of almost 1,000 separate image files.

Carina Nebula

NASA
Photo credit NASA

This breathtaking photo of Carina Nebula gives a perspective that humans have never seen, revealing previously invisible areas of the birth of young stars.

Known as the Cosmic Cliffs, the landscape of what looks like mountains are speckled with glittering stars and is essentially a stellar nursery. Some of the "peaks" span up to seven light-years high.

Follow Rex Ravita II on Twitter @rexravita. Follow us on Twitter @KRLD.

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