Program at Minneapolis school aims to train and place students in food manufacturing careers

Summit Academy program, beginning in February, will rely on training from industry professionals with experience at companies like General Mills, Cargill, and Kowalski's
A new program at one Minneapolis school will train students for careers in the food manufacturing industry. The aim is to help them learn from professionals who have experience with companies like General Mills, Cargill, and Kowalski's.
A new program at one Minneapolis school will train students for careers in the food manufacturing industry. The aim is to help them learn from professionals who have experience with companies like General Mills, Cargill, and Kowalski's. Photo credit (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A new program at one school in Minneapolis aims to quickly train and place young people in food manufacturing jobs–perhaps with some of the world’s biggest names in food production.

Summit Academy is partnering with 4 Access, an agency made up of industry professionals, to train students for jobs with companies like General Mills, Cargill, Kowalski’s, and Second Harvest.

“There’s no question there’s great need in the food industry,” said John Mendesh, co-founder of 4 Access after 30 years working for General Mills. “Certainly within the Twin Cities that’s a vibrant and important part of the economy.”

The goal is to have industry professionals like Mendesh teach the students over seven weeks and place them in jobs.

“One of the things that’s intriguing about the food manufacturing industry is while you might start out in a position where you’re paid $20 an hour and work a variety of different shifts, there’s also an opportunity there for supervising later on, and different positions within the food industry,” said Miriam Williams, chief academic officer for Summit Academy.

The school normally has 900 students a year training in a variety of job fields.

The food manufacturing class opens February 27.

Featured Image Photo Credit: (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)