STRIKE A POSE: Jill Biden, shot by Annie Leibovitz, is Vogue's latest cover

First lady Jill Biden on the cover of Vogue's August 2021 issue, on newsstands nationwide July 20, in a dress by Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia for Oscar de la Renta. Earrings by Tiffany & Co. Fashion Editor: Tonne Goodman, hair by Sally Hershberger and makeup by Francelle Daly.
First lady Jill Biden on the cover of Vogue's August 2021 issue, on newsstands nationwide July 20, on the balcony overlooking the South Lawn of the White House. She's wearing a dress by Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia for Oscar de la Renta. Earrings by Tiffany & Co. Fashion Editor: Tonne Goodman, hair by Sally Hershberger and makeup by Francelle Daly. Photo credit Annie Leibovitz//Vogue

NEW YORK (1010 WINS) -- Style-savvy first lady Dr. Jill Biden graces the cover of Vogue's August 2021 issue and appears in a pictorial, all shot by celeb shutterbug Annie Liebovitz.

Dr. Biden, in a Ralph Lauren blouse and skirt, in the East Sitting Hall of the White House. Fashion Editor: Tonne Goodman
Dr. Biden, in a Ralph Lauren blouse and skirt, in the East Sitting Hall of the White House. Fashion Editor: Tonne Goodman Photo credit Annie Leibovitz/Vogue

Vogue took a hiatus from first ladies on its covers when Melania Trump had the position.

Biden, who turned 70 this month, opens up to Vogue about the changing tone of the country.

“During the campaign, I felt so much anxiety from people; they were scared," she told journalist Jonathan van Meter. "When I travel around the country now, I feel as though people can breathe again. I think that’s part of the reason Joe was elected. People wanted someone to come in and heal this nation, not just from the pandemic, which I feel Joe did by, you know, getting shots in everybody’s arms. But also...he’s just a calmer president. He lowers the temperature.”

President Joe Biden and First lady Dr. Jill Biden
President Joe Biden and First lady Dr. Jill Biden Photo credit Annie Liebovitz/Vogue

Biden also spoke about her newly-expanded platform,

“When I became second lady—and there was so much I wanted to do—I always said, ‘I will never waste this platform," she said. "And now I have a bigger platform and I feel every day, like....What could I give up? That I would want to give up? Nothing. If anything, I feel like adding more things, but I know it’s not possible, because you want to stay centered, because you want to do things well. And there’s so much to do. There is...so. Much. To. Do.”

The first lady also scoffed at detractors who doubted she could teach and fulfill the roles of first lady.

“I heard that all the time during the campaign," she told Vogue. "Like, ‘No. You’re not going to be able to teach as first lady.’ And I said, ‘Why not? You make things happen, right?’”