Zeoli says Netflix CEO has it right standing by his top comedians

A sign is posted in front of Netflix headquarters on April 20, 2022 in Los Gatos, California. Shares of Netflix dropped over 35 percent after the company reported that it had lost 200,000 subscribers for the first time in the first quarter.
A sign is posted in front of Netflix headquarters on April 20, 2022 in Los Gatos, California. Shares of Netflix dropped over 35 percent after the company reported that it had lost 200,000 subscribers for the first time in the first quarter. Photo credit Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Aggression towards Comedians has grown worse throughout the last decade as cancel culture and political correctness threaten to end the days of the stand-up comic. But one company is standing by its comedians.

Rich Zeoli, host of the Rich Zeoli Show on 1210 WPHT News Radio, shared that, unlike many, Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos has stood behind the company's top comedians.

While many have called for comedians Dave Chapelle and Ricky Gervais to be canceled for the jokes called offensive by certain groups, Netflix has stood by them, going as far as to tell workers if they are offended, maybe this isn't the place for them.

Netflix recently aired a special by Gervais in which he delivers jokes about transgender people, and Zeoli shared that the "woke" mob is now taking shots at the streaming giant once again.

Sarandos came out in support of Gervais and the special while also pointing to a fund Netflix has to support transgender and non-binary content creators.

In an interview, the CEO also pointed to what he believes is a right to free expression. In addition, he went on to say that comedians need to test the water and that they won't know what's too far until they've crossed the line.

But for many, this is unacceptable, and Zeoli said that for many, a joke is seen as a personal attack and meant to cause harm when in fact, it's meant to be the opposite.

"They interpret words as weapons," Zeoli said. "Words are weapons. They wound sometimes."

While Zeoli takes the jokes in the special for what they are, he says those upset see the words from Gervais and other comedians as "violence."

"So many on the left nowadays, not only do they want these comedians taken down, they are literally saying that their words will equate to violence or political action," Zeoli said while adding this sentiment is ludacris.