Ketanji Brown Jackson starts on Supreme Court this week, here are the 1st cases she faces

U.S. President Joe Biden, Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson and Vice President Kamala Harris pose at a courtesy visit in the Justices Conference Room prior to the investiture ceremony of Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson September 30, 2022 in Washington, DC.
U.S. President Joe Biden, Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson and Vice President Kamala Harris pose at a courtesy visit in the Justices Conference Room prior to the investiture ceremony of Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson September 30, 2022 in Washington, DC. Photo credit Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images

The newest Supreme Court Justice is ready to get to work.

Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson took part in her official investiture ceremony on Friday -- an event attended by both President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris.

Jackson was sworn in earlier this year as the first Black woman ever to serve on the nation's highest court. She begins her new job this week as the new Supreme Court term begins.

The Supreme Court is taking on some hot-button issues this term and is expected to make some landmark decisions.

The justices will review major cases on affirmative action, voting rights, immigration, LGBTQ rights and free speech. Other cases will be added as the term goes on, before the justices take a summer break in June.

Among Jackson's first cases will be the Clean Water Act, which could loosen pollution regulations and determine which wetlands and other bodies of water deserve federal protections, among other things.

Jackson will also take on a case about voting rights that involves Alabama. The court could further reduce protections for minority voters in its third major consideration in 10 years of the landmark Voting Rights Act, which was enacted to combat enduring racial discrimination in voting, the Associated Press reported.

Also on elections, the court could decide to change how they take place nationwide. The justices will review the "independent state legislature" theory, which asserts that the Constitution gives state legislatures the power to draw voting maps and set election laws, without any oversight from other authorities such as state courts or the governor, according to Business Insider.

On affirmative action, the court could decide to end any consideration of race in college admissions. The case involves lawsuits brought by Students for Fair Admissions, an anti-affirmative action organization, which claims Harvard, the University of North Carolina and other schools discriminate against Asian students.

Another case pits LGBTQ equality against religious liberty. The justices will decide if state law can compel a private business to serve LGBTQ clients, or whether the First Amendment protects business owners who violate those laws on religious grounds, MarketWatch reported.

On immigration, the Biden administration is appealing a ruling against a policy that prioritizes deportation of people in the country illegally who pose the greatest public safety risk, the AP reported. The justices will decide whether to end a Trump-era policy, which that removed people in the country illegally regardless of criminal history or community ties.

The justices are expected to decide each case before the end of June.

Featured Image Photo Credit: Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images