Disney's 'Frozen' helped solve a chilling 62-year-old cold case

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By , Audacy

Elsa and Anna are solving mysteries.

Disney’s animated film “Frozen” helped researchers solve a 62-year-old cold case.

Technology used in the Pixar film helped to piece together what likely happened the night of the Dyatlov Pass incident.

In January 1959, a group of students and their instructor went on an expedition to the Ural Mountains otherwise known as “Dead Mountain.”

The hikers pitched their tents for the night when a blizzard hit and temperatures dropped to minus 19 degrees Fahrenheit.

Their tents were found ripped open the next day with all nine of the hikers' bodies scattered throughout the campsite. No one survived.

For 62 years, the mystery of what led to their deaths went unsolved as the "small collapse" was unlikely to cause such blunt force trauma. It became Russia’s most famous cold case.

That all changed when one researcher watched the children’s movie for the first time in 2013.

Johan Guame of the Snow Avalanche Simulation Laboratory was impressed with the film’s realistic snow.

Guame decided to email the animators to inquire about the technology used to simulate the movement of falling snow.

“From there, he traveled to Los Angeles to meet with the specialist responsible for the movement on-screen. The researcher obtained a version of the snow animation code for his avalanche simulations. Gaume intended to figure out how avalanches would affect the human body,” the report read, according to Inside the Magic.

His research allowed him to build a model that explained how the hikers sustained extreme injuries to their bodies. These injuries, the report noted, would be normal with this type of rare avalanche, which he believes is what led to the deaths in the Dyaltov Pass Incident.

“People don’t want it to be an avalanche. It’s too normal,” Gaume explained of an incident.

While the case isn't closed and many questions have gone unanswered, at least now, researchers can "let go" of the conspiracy theories.

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Featured Image Photo Credit:  Brett Carlsen/Getty Images for Disney