How to support a child who is transgender or nonbinary

trans rights
Photo credit Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images

According to The Trevor Project, transgender and nonbinary children who are not supported by their families are more likely to experience depression, substance abuse, and low self-esteem.

This is why family counselors say it’s imperative that parents support their children as they come out as transgender or non-binary.

A girl hi-fives reveler as she marches in the New York City Gay Pride March on June 24, 2012 in New York City. The annual civil rights demonstration commemorates the Stonewall riots of 1969, which erupted after a police raid on a gay bar, the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street. (Photo by Michael Nagle/Getty Images)
A girl hi-fives reveler as she marches in the New York City Gay Pride March on June 24, 2012 in New York City. The annual civil rights demonstration commemorates the Stonewall riots of 1969, which erupted after a police raid on a gay bar, the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street. Photo credit (Photo by Michael Nagle/Getty Images)

But parents guiding their child through gender exploration often have a lot of questions. How should they react to their children coming out as trans or nonbinary? What’s age-appropriate to discuss? Should these conversations be happening with all children, including those who are trans or non-binary?

On the latest episode of "It's OK to Say Gay," psychotherapist and author Benjamin Davis guides us through the best ways to handle these topics.

LGBTQ experts say books can also help those conversations, especially when parents struggle with finding resources in their community. But there’s one glaring problem: book bans. The American Library Association’s State of The Libraries report found that over 1,500 books — many by or about Black or LGBTQ+ people — were removed from schools, libraries, and universities.

OurShelves, a kid’s book subscription service, is filling bookshelf gaps brought on by the bans. Families can sign up to receive a curated selection of diverse children’s titles featuring underrepresented characters. Founder Alli Harper joins us this week to discuss the two major problems in the children’s publishing industry she’s working to fix.

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Featured Image Photo Credit: Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images