Ruth Bader Ginsburg auction raises $800,000 and here are the priciest items

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg participates in a discussion at the Georgetown University Law Center on February 10, 2020 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg participates in a discussion at the Georgetown University Law Center on February 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. Photo credit (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS RADIO) – Art prints and works by Pablo Picasso were some of the highest priced items sold recently in an auction of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s belongings.

Overall, 150 of Ginsburg’s items raised approximately $800,000 to benefit the Washington National Opera, according to CBS News.

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The Potomack Company auction house of Alexandria, Va., listed a 1983 Giclee art print of Ginsburg by artist Eleanor Davis that hung in the justice’s chambers as the priciest item with a sale tag of $55,000. This is far more than its estimated $100-$150 price.

Other high price items from Ginsburg’s collection included:

·       A screen-print piece called “Red Orange Wall” by Josef Albers from the bedroom of Ginsburg’s Watergate condo, estimated at $600 to $800 and sold for $27,500

·       A 1953 ceramic pitcher by Pablo Picasso called “Centaure et Visage” from the living room of Ginsburg’s condo that was estimated at $5,000 to $7,000 and sold for $25,000

·       A 1956 white earthenware ceramic plate by Picasso called “Jaqueline Au Cevalet” from Ginsburg’s dining room that was estimated at $8,000 to $12,000 and sold for $22,500

·       A bronze relief by artist Glenna Goodacre called “Son of Sacagawea” that was estimated at $300 to $500 and sold for $20,000

In a 17-lot collection of Ginsburg’s art, there were two other works by Picasso – a plate that sold for $16,000 and an engraving that sold for $13,000.
There were also six more pieces by Goodacre, whose works include the Vietnam Women’s Memorial on the National Mall and the Sacagawea U.S. dollar coin.

Buyers bid on works from the Ginsburg collection last month starting on April 16.

In addition to art work, The Potomack Company auctioned off some of Ginsburg’s personal items, including:

·       Ginsburg’s National Women’s Hall of Fame medal from 2002, estimated at $1,000 to $2,000 and sold for $30,000

·       A monogrammed Gartenhaus natural black mink coat that she often wore to the opera, estimated at $500 to $1,000 and sold for $16,000

·        A 1986 drawing of the “Bubbie of Liberty” by Ginsburg’s grandson Paul Spera, estimated at $100 to $150 and sold for $12,000

Elizabeth Haynie Wainstein, the owner of The Potomack Company auction house said they were “just really blown away by the interest,” according to the Associated Press.

Ginsburg died in 2020 at age 87. A Brooklyn native, Ginsburg graduated at the top of her class from Cornell University, and cared for her young child and her husband Martin as he battled testicular cancer while both young parents studied at Harvard Law School.

At the school, Ginsburg served as the first female member of the Harvard Law Review. She directed the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union during the 1970s and successfully argued six landmark cases before the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1993, former President Bill Clinton nominated her to the U.S. Supreme Court, where she was part of a liberal bloc. After he death, former President Donald Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative Catholic judge, to replace her.

Coney Barrett is thought to be one of the Supreme Court justices who supported a draft majority opinion that would reverse abortion protections established by Roe v. Wade that leaked last week.

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Featured Image Photo Credit: (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)