CT storyteller recounts facing off against 'Jeopardy!' super-champion

NEW YORK (WCBS 880) — A Connecticut storyteller has quite the story to tell after facing off against “Jeopardy’s” all-time female winner last week.

Terry Wolfisch Cole, a professional storyteller with her own workshops, appeared on the show last Thursday, taking on Amy Schneider – who has since become the first woman to win $1 million on the show.

Live On-Air
W C B S Eight Eighty
WCBS Newsradio 880
Listen Now
Now Playing
Now Playing

Though she ultimately lost, Cole said she has plenty to talk about from her "Jeopardy!” experience.

In this week’s Sweet Spot, she told WCBS 880’s Mike Sugerman that it was simply an honor to be on the show, after she studied for months and months.

“I know multiple people who have gotten in the contestant pool without ever getting the call,” she said.

However, the New York-native now living in Simsbury, said she was shocked when she got to her podium.

“Amy was introduced with $855,000 in her bank, and we thought they were kidding,” she said.

Terry Wolfisch Cole
Terry Wolfisch Cole outside the "Jeopardy!" studio in Los Angeles, California. Photo credit Terry Wolfisch Cole

Cole said she immediately remembered all the times she sat memorizing flashcards at her dining room table, and all the online tests she had to go through to become a contestant on the show.

She noted that she learned a lot in the time leading up to her episode, but when she was on the stage, she learned the competition can be much more intense than people may realize.

“Amy knows a lot of stuff, Amy has fantastic recall and Amy is super smart on the buzzer,” Cole said.

Cole stressed that the buzzer may be what truly set Schneider apart from her competitors.

“Nobody tries out for ‘Jeopardy!’ on a whim,” Cole said. “The buzzer speed is what differentiates the super champs from everybody else. If you watch my episode, you will see many questions— I’m buzzing, and Amy beat me in.”

Would Cole have won if she was not up against a super champion? “That is the unanswerable question,” she said.

Now that she is no longer a contestant, she plans to return to doing what she does best: storytelling.

She may even tell her “Jeopardy” story when she performs in Hartford next month.