In full bloom: Eastern Market's Flower Day expected to draw over 200,000 visitors this Sunday

Images of Detroit are deeply rooted within the automotive industry; it's a working class city known for sparks, steel and grit, but in a historic corner of the city, colorful petals, vivid blooms and greenery make up an amazing transformation for Flower Day.
Photo credit © Diane Weiss, Diane Weiss/Detroit Free Press

(WWJ) - Images of Detroit are deeply rooted within the automotive industry; it's a working class city known for sparks, steel and grit, but in a historic corner of the city, colorful petals, vivid blooms and greenery make up an amazing transformation for Flower Day.

On the Sunday after Mother's Day for over 50 years, the Motor City's Eastern Market fills to the brim with roses, peonies, marigolds, and every kind of flower imaginable for Flower Day.

But this Sunday, May 15, is very special: it's first Flower Day after a three-year shutdown over COVID-19 and people are excited for its return.

"Flower Day is the best thing for Detroit right now when people come down here everyone's nice," Jermaine Pugh said to WWJ's Zach Clark. "It's a great environment -- you get to mingle, not only buy flowers, but talk to people, it's just a great time, a great experience for everyone."

A record-setting crowd of over 200,000 people is expected to attend the event, a prediction higher than past years due to pent-up demand from being closed since the last Flower Day in 2019.

So what is it about flowers? Why is Flower Day so important to Detroit? WWJ's Zach Clark explores how this flourishing event has taken root and grown into a unique part of the Motor City.