Trump allies don’t understand why he continues to embrace Q

Former President Donald Trump speaks at a Save America Rally to support Republican candidates running for state and federal offices in the state at the Covelli Centre on September 17, 2022 in Youngstown, Ohio. Republican Senate Candidate JD Vance and Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) spoke to supporters along with former President Trump.(Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
Former President Donald Trump speaks at a Save America Rally to support Republican candidates running for state and federal offices in the state at the Covelli Centre on September 17, 2022 in Youngstown, Ohio. Republican Senate Candidate JD Vance and Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) spoke to supporters along with former President Trump. Photo credit (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

As some key supporters of former President Donald Trump utilize his fanbase in the QAnon conspiracy theory movement, others are puzzled as to why he continues to embrace the theory.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, QAnon is “the umbrella term for a sprawling spiderweb of right-wing internet conspiracy theories with antisemitic and anti-LGBTQ elements.” Those who adhere to “Q” also claim “the world is run by a secret cabal of pedophiles who worship Satan and are plotting against President Trump.”

NBC News reporter Ben Collins has been chronicling the conspiracy theory for years.

“The QAnon conspiracy theory was built around Q, an anonymous account that posts periodically on 8kun [online message boards], often with vague or symbolic language that is then interpreted by followers,” he explained in a recent article about Trump promoting QAnon accounts on his Truth Social platform. Collins noted that “none of the [Q] posts’ concrete predictions have come to fruition.”

Rolling Stone reported Tuesday that Republican politician Devin Nunes, who serves as CEO of Truth Social appears to “intentionally court QAnon figures and followers in order to build out the user base of Trump’s personal social media platform.”

A NewsGuard report from August found that Truth Social actively promotes QAnon.

Other Trump supporters are not as willing to embrace the conspiracy, Rolling Stone said.

“F*** if I know,” one Trump ally said when asked about Trump’s support of Q. Rolling Stone said others indicated the former president is “a Boomer internet troll who just loves to be liked,” and that he simply likes that the QAnon adherents view him as a “supposed god-emperor.”

“To be fair, he says that they’re some of his biggest fans, which, you know, is his thing,” said an unnamed source. This source, which Rolling Stone describes as a person close to Trump, said that the real estate mogul thinks the Q memes are funny and that the media’s reaction to his Q promotion is funny as well.

A Rolling Stone source identified as a former White House official said that Trump would say during his term in office that Q followers had “the right idea” and inferred that the conspiracy wasn’t that far-fetched. He also promoted QAnon tweets before he was blocked from Twitter.

An article in The Atlantic this week also posited that Trump is leaning on QAnon because he is “stuck,” as he continues to gives signs of support to QAnon adherents, according to Rolling Stone.

“The latest came during the final minutes of Trump’s rally in Youngstown, Ohio, last Saturday, when ‘Mirrors,’ a song by composer Will Van De Crommert that has become popular in the QAnon community, was played as the former president delivered a diatribe about how America is going to hell under President Joe Biden,” the outlet reported.

Trump held up an index finger to the sky as the song played, which some think might be a sign to Q followers. His appearance at the rally was also in support of J.R. Majewski, “an Ohio House candidate with deep ties to the QAnon movement.”

A Rolling Stone source “intimately familiar with this matter,” said Trump claimed this summer that the QAnon believers are just misunderstood. This echoes his “go home, we love you,” speech to a crowd that included QAnon followers at the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol riot now under investigation by the House select committee.

Featured Image Photo Credit: (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)