Don’t drive on flooded streets, d*mnit!

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Living in Louisiana means flooding when it rains.

Not every time, but enough of the time that people invariably will try to drive down a flooded street or ford a flooded underpass and the inevitable happens.

They. Get. Stuck.

Media has time and again tried to show the futility of such half-brained maneuvers.

But it seems people just don’t get the memo.

So here we go again:

A tropical storm is headed our way, rain is in the forecast, and there could be 8-to-10 inches of rain fall before this storm moves on.

Well this time we went to an authority on flooding matters to talk about staying out of the water once and for all.

Scott Boyle is the Assistant District Administrator of Operations for the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development in the Orleans District.

He cautions drivers: “One of the issues with that is that sometimes you don’t realize how deep they can be.   And you may be on the elevated expressway and you try to exit and there may be water and you have no idea how deep that water is.”

Scott Boyle, with DOTD, says it doesn't take a lot of water to lift a car.

“The vehicle doesn’t have to be completely submerged for something like that to happen.  Because of the principles of buoyancy.  And heavy vehicles can certainly take on a lot of water and can certainly move from their stationery position during these times.”

Now that you've heard from an expert, consider yourself warned.  Don't go driving around on flooded streets or trying to ford flooded underpasses.

“During tropical storms there are heavy, heavy periods of extended rainfall.  It’s certainly best to drive with caution and to stay indoors and to refrain from driving unless it’s absolutely necessary.”

You know better than to try and cross a flooded intersection or underpass.  But let’s say you do get stuck.  Boyle recommends: “If your vehicle starts getting into a situation with high water the best thing to do is stop and back up if you do not think you can proceed through it.  But if you’re in a situation where you’re taking on water, the best thing to do is try to get out of it.”

It’s better to write off your car than write off your life—remember that.

You’ve been warned.