Emma: Embarrassed by Packers in primetime, Bears need to call their future into question

The Bears lost their fifth straight game, falling 41-25 to the Packers on Sunday night.
75756A5E-120A-4932-810C-2FD980DB785E

(670 The Score) When Matt Nagy was hired as the Bears' head coach in January of 2018, he was reminded by team chairman George McCaskey of how important the rivalry with the Packers is to his family.

McCaskey makes sure every Bears head coach understands the importance of their two games against the Packers, which serve as a litmus test for where Chicago stands against the class of its division. Far too often over this last decade, the Packers have brought the McCaskey family and the Bears embarrassment.

That was again the case as the Packers beat up the Bears, 41-25, at Lambeau Field on Sunday night. The Bears (5-6) were handed their fifth consecutive loss and are now closer to considerable organizational change than a playoff spot.

"We're frustrated," Nagy said. "We're pissed off. We're angry. Every feeling that (fans) have, we have. But we got to fix it. And we got to do it on the football field."

This was the type of humbling loss for the Bears that could mark the beginning of the end for Nagy, general manager Ryan Pace and the leaders of this disappointing football team. It wasn't just that Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers picked apart the Bears' defense once again. It appeared a few Bears were also quitting late in the game.

Consider the reactions to the latest disheartening loss in primetime, and it left the McCaskeys with a lot to consider on the drive south down I-43 back home. Bears running back Tarik Cohen tweeted during the game, "Thought if I didn’t watch we would play way better. (F***)." Legendary Bears linebacker Lance Briggs tweeted a meme of the team's "GSH" emblem -- an homage to team founder George Stanley Halas -- with the letters "WTF."

NBC analyst Tony Dungy, who coached the Colts to a victory over the Bears in Super Bowl XLI, remarked during the third quarter that Chicago's defense had "basically given up." The Bears became a punchline for a national television audience.

"Obviously, it wasn't acceptable," star pass rusher Khalil Mack said. "It was embarrassing."

Even the Bears' official Twitter account tweeted before the fourth quarter, "We just send the tweets." Because who wants to be accountable for this downfall? Chicago was on top of the NFC North two years ago and seemed poised to stay there for many years under the watch of Nagy and Pace.

The Bears went 12-4 in 2018, then 8-8 a year later. They'll be lucky to finish with a winning record this season. They're riding a five-game losing streak with five more games remaining, and each could push the McCaskeys closer to an organizational overhaul.

Mitchell Trubisky returned at quarterback in place of the injured Nick Foles, but for the first three quarters, the Bears had their usual offensive problems all while their defense was carved up by Rodgers and the Packers. Chicago posted 351 yards of offense and 5.4 yards per play for the game, but three turnovers from Trubisky -- two interceptions and a fumble that was returned for a touchdown -- proved costly.

What was most concerning from the Bears was the poor all-around effort from a team that has vowed to fight and a defense that seemed to have checked out. This was the kind of showing Nagy seemed convinced the Bears would never have under his watch.

Fresh off a bye week and hoping to salvage their season, the Bears instead looked ready to pack it up and go home for the offseason.

The Bears close out their season on Jan. 3 by hosting the Packers at Soldier Field. In the days that follow, McCaskey and the franchise's board of directors will hold their customary end-of-season meeting and evaluate the future. What will be the tone of those discussions? Will Nagy and Pace still have their jobs once those meetings conclude?

If this loss to the Packers is any indication, the Bears could have some major decisions to make after this season. They were left embarrassed once again on the national stage.

"You got to soul search," Nagy said. "And you got to be able to stop the bleeding."

Chris Emma covers the Bears, Chicago’s sports scene and more for 670TheScore.com. Follow him on Twitter @CEmma670.