Family of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs sues team for wrongful death

Tyler Skaggs #45 of the Los Angeles Angels pitches in the first inning of the game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on June 29, 2019 in Anaheim, California.
Tyler Skaggs #45 of the Los Angeles Angels pitches in the first inning of the game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on June 29, 2019 in Anaheim, California. Photo credit (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)

The family of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs has sued the team and two former employees for wrongful death and negligence, according to the LA Times.

Skaggs died of an overdose in a Texas hotel room before a game against the Texas Rangers nearly two years ago. The paper reported that Skaggs' family allege an Angels employee was supplying drugs to multiple players, including Skaggs.

Former communications director Eric Kay and vice president of communications Tim Mead were also named in the suit.

“The Angels owed Tyler Skaggs a duty to provide a safe place to work and play baseball,” the lawsuit said.

“The Angels breached their duty when they allowed Kay, a drug addict, complete access to Tyler. The Angels also breached their duty when they allowed Kay to provide Tyler with dangerous illegal drugs. The Angels should have known Kay was dealing drugs to players. Tyler died as a result of the Angels’ breach of their duties.”

It is not clear how much Skagg’s family is seeking in damages.

LA Times sports writer Mike DiGiovanna shared a response from the Angeles on Twitter shortly after news of the lawsuit broke.

The statement read: "These lawsuits are entirely without merit and the allegations are baseless and irresponsible. The Angels Organization strongly disputes the claims made by the Skaggs family and will vigorously defend these lawsuits in court.”

Kay is already facing criminal charges in Texas related to Skaggs’ death.

Kay was charged with drug distribution and drug conspiracy for allegedly providing Skaggs with the drugs he overdosed on. The charges carry possible maximums of a life sentence and 20 years in prison, respectively.

The San Bernardino Sun reported that the Drug Enforcement Administration claimed "several individuals" knew Kay had been supplying Skaggs with fentanyl before his death.