Insurance Federation of Minnesota warns of 'too good to be true' offers that often follow severe weather

Storm
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The Insurance Federation of Minnesota is warning Minnesotans about potential scams in the wake of powerful storms that left behind a trail of destruction on Wednesday night.

Storms passing through the Twin Cities packed a powerful punch with powerful winds knocking down trees and powerlines, and at one point, leaving over 75,000 people without power according to Xcel Energy.

"You will get solicited for business by companies that we call storm chasers," said Mark Kulda, Vice President of Public Affairs with the Insurance Federation of Minnesota. "These are often times just sales and marketing companies that don't even do roofing work. They'll come around and talk you into getting a bid from them."

Kulda joined Vineeta Sawkar on the WCCO Radio Morning News and told listeners that they don't need to look far for help after a storm.

"The best thing to do, if you can, contact a local reputable company from Minnesota or the Twin Cities that you know is here, somebody that will be here after the storm and storm cleanup, and after the damage is repaired," he said. "If there's anything that goes wrong with the repair, you'll know who to go to."

Kulda said they often see people get left behind by companies just looking to make a quick dollar or two.

"These are fly by night operators who do low quality work at a high price and then they're gone," added Kulda.

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While filing a claim should be a quick and easy process, finding a contractor to make needed repairs could take a bit longer than usual because of all the claims being made.

"Contractors themselves get backed up," Kulda said. "Usually what happens is the claim gets approved and you have to wait a bit of time for contractors to get crews in line to get the work done. We expect there will be a larger number of claims than normal because of how big the storm was."